Events & Symposia

Events & Symposia

The Network of the Learning Sciences in Canada is organized mainly by researchers affiliated with Canadian universities but our network is not bounded by national borders. Our learning sessions are free to participate for anyone who is interested in discussing pressing issues in the Learning Sciences.

Upcoming events

Title: Learning the Hard Way


April, 28, 2022, 12 PM - 1.30 pm MT

Abstract: In this talk, Professor Jurow reflects on the tools and aims of the Learning Sciences in light of a sustained experience of institutional violence that was thrust upon her. As a Learning Scientist, Jurow looked to her field to help her make sense of what was happening and how to stop it. Her experience called the Learning Sciences up short. Learning the hard way compelled Jurow to draw on theories and concepts – from outside of the field – that foreground how intersections of whiteness, patriarchy, and bureaucracy undermine collective action for justice in the academy. Jurow invites the audience to consider a set of ideas that might be integrated into the conceptual and analytic repertoire of the Learning Sciences as a way to strengthen the field’s capacity for advancing transformative learning.


Link for registration: https://bit.ly/3LVejBr

Past Events & Symposia

Learning and Emotion: Critical Perspectives

February 9, 2022

This session featured Dr. Tanner Vea and Dr. Sarah El Halwany in the form of scholarly discussion and small group discussion. The discussion was followed by social activities.

Moderated by Dr. Chris Ostrowdun and Dr. Rishi Krishnamoorthy

About Our Speakers:

Dr. Tanner Vea is an Assistant Professor at the Penn State University, College of Education. His works are exploring emotion, politics, and relation as learning processes and outcomes. Check Dr. Vea's writing on emotions and learning in the Journal of the Learning Sciences and in the British Journal of Educational Technology.

Dr. Sarah El Halwany is a Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Calgary, Werklund School of Education. She studies the affective politics within science education environments, focusing on the reproductive and productive capacities of bodies, emotions and discourses. Check Dr. El Halwany's writing on the affective politics in the Cultural Studies of Science Education.

The session was moderated by Dr. Chris Ostrowdun (Postdoctoral Fellow, Mount Royal University) and Dr. Rishi Krishnamoorthy (Postdoctoral Scholar, Rutgers University)


Ethical and Political Dimensions of Our Work


November 17, 2021

11am-1pm PT/12-2pm MST/ 1-3pmCT/2-4pm EST


Network of the Learning Sciences in Canada is organized mainly by researchers affiliated with Canadian universities but our network is not bounded by national borders. Our learning sessions are free to participate for anyone who is interested in discussing pressing issues in the learning sciences.


In this session, we discuss two recent articles in the Journal of the Learning Sciences (Curnow & Jurow, 2021 and Philip & Sengupta, 2021) in the form of panel discussion and small group discussion. Please read these articles in advance!


Anyone who is interested is welcome.


Part I: Panel Discussion (50 minutes)

with Dr. Jennifer Adams, Dr. Joe Curnow, Dr. Jrene Rahm, Dr. Pratim Sengupta

moderated by Dr. Miwa A. Takeuchi and Dr. Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur


Part II: Small Group Discussion (70 minutes)

Learning In and For Collective Action

In collaboration with the Journal of the Learning Sciences, we hosted a public webinar based on the Special Issue for Learning In and For Collective Action (led by Dr. Joe Curnow and Dr. Susan Jurow).

Special Issue is available https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/hlns20/30/1


Creating a Public Forum of Critical Learning Sciences Scholarship in Canada



The NLSC is committed to work toward becoming a public forum of critical scholarship addressing inequity, racism, and social injustice in education through research in the Learning Sciences. We do not argue that all learning sciences scholars should change their research agenda, but should recognize the pervasiveness of the silence by the Canadian institutions and our scholarship and start having conversations on how we can take actions. The purpose of this panel is therefore to start the conversations among the Canadian Learning Sciences scholars of diverse research interests and backgrounds whether or not they have critical scholarly agendas and have in-depth conversations on what we can do through our scholarship, teaching, and service responsibilities in academic institutions.